Planned Parenthood Sues Texas Over Abortion Restrictions

Cecile Richards
Cecile Richards, president of Planned Parenthood Federation of America.

Planned Parenthood, the United States' largest abortion provider, filed a lawsuit in federal court on Friday challenging part of a new law restricting abortions in the state of Texas.

"We're in court today to stop a terrible situation for women in Texas from getting even worse," Cecile Richards, president of Planned Parenthood Federation of America, said in a statement.

The lawsuit challenges a provision stating that doctors who provide abortions must have admitting privileges at a local hospital, and another part that requires direct supervision of a doctor for women to receive the so-called "abortion pill" RU-486.

The Texas attorney general's office had no immediate comment on the lawsuit.

Opponents contend the new law could make it more difficult for women to get an abortion in rural areas of the vast state. They also say the procedure requires very few women to be admitted to a hospital.

The issue has dominated Texas politics and helped to elevate the profile of a leading Democratic critic, state Sen. Wendy Davis, who staged a nearly 11-hour filibuster against abortion restrictions and has told supporters she may run for governor.


Reporting by Greg McCune and Mary Wisniewski in Chicago and Edith Honan in New York; Editing by Scott Malone and Gunna Dickson

© 2013 Thomson Reuters. All rights reserved.

 Planned Parenthood, the United States' largest abortion provider, filed a lawsuit in federal court on Friday challenging part of a new law restricting abortions in the state of Texas.

"We're in court today to stop a terrible situation for women in Texas from getting even worse," Cecile Richards, president of Planned Parenthood Federation of America, said in a statement.

The lawsuit challenges a provision stating that doctors who provide abortions must have admitting privileges at a local hospital, and another part that requires direct supervision of a doctor for women to receive the so-called "abortion pill" RU-486.

The Texas attorney general's office had no immediate comment on the lawsuit.

Opponents contend the new law could make it more difficult for women to get an abortion in rural areas of the vast state. They also say the procedure requires very few women to be admitted to a hospital.

The issue has dominated Texas politics and helped to elevate the profile of a leading Democratic critic, state Senator Wendy Davis, who staged a nearly 11-hour filibuster against abortion restrictions and has told supporters she may run for governor.

(Reporting by Greg McCune and Mary Wisniewski in Chicago and Edith Honan in New York; Editing by Scott Malone and Gunna Dickson)

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