How Benham Brothers Are Interceding for Gay Christian Rocker Trey Pearson

Trey Pearson
Trey Pearson (Facebook)

We said it in our column last week, and we say again today: It's important to bring clarity in the midst of cultural confusion. This week, another story surfaced that calls for more clarity.

The Washington Post and WND ran stories on Trey Pearson, the Christian rock star who recently came out as gay in a public letter to fans and friends. In his letter, Pearson talked about how he, a professing Christian, husband and father, will now pursue a homosexual relationship rather than continue in his marriage to his wife.

Trey said this was a defining moment for him—a moment when he finally found himself.

Unfortunately, he now defines himself by what he feels on the inside instead of what his faith demands of him. We pray he remembers Christ's words: "If anyone will come after Me, let him deny himself, and take up his cross, and follow Me" (Matt. 16:24).

Get Spirit-filled content delivered right to your inbox! Click here to subscribe to our newsletter.

Denial of self is central to the Christian faith. It's a rejection of our stubborn sinful nature that seeks dominion in our lives. And it's a daily dying, too; trust us! Yet through Christ, we have the victory—but we must deny self.

Trey wrote, "In sharing this publicly, I'm taking another step into health and wholeness by accepting myself, and every part of me."

When Trey chooses feelings over faith, it doesn't mean God doesn't love him or value him highly. Quite the contrary is true. But refusing to deny himself by accepting his sinful nature is a denial of the cross of Christ.

Our hearts break for him—as well as for his wife and kids.

True identity comes from a point outside ourselves, never from what we feel inside. This is why true, biblical Christianity is so powerful—because Christ changes us from the inside out and gives us a new identity in Him (a fixed point outside ourselves).

When a professing Christian leader defines himself through his sexual attractions rather than his Christian convictions and uses the Bible to justify it, the flaws are obvious.

Suppose a Christian musician, who happens to be married with kids, performs at your church and concludes his concert by standing center stage and saying, "Guys, I have to be true to myself. I really like the woman in the front row and would enjoy a romantic relationship with her. I just can't deny these feelings any longer. I already spoke with my wife backstage, and she fully supports me in this."

Crazy, right?

There's no difference in Trey's situation—only the sex of the new partner has been switched in our hypothetical story.

Trey continues in his letter, "I'm still the same guy, with the same heart, who wants to love God."

Well, it's easy to love God—our way—but it's much more difficult to love God His way.

"Jesus answered him, 'If a man loves Me, he will keep My word. My Father will love him, and We will come to him, and make Our home with him. He who does not love Me does not keep My words'" (John 14:23-24a).

Loving God means listening to Him. And if we haven't listened to Him, we simply need to confess—or repeat what He says about—our sin. This is the first step toward healing.

Trey says he's been "blocking out and not dealing with real feelings going on inside of me." Well, we all struggle with feelings that aren't God's best for us. It's sin living inside of us.

The apostle Paul even struggled with this, saying, "For I know that in me (that is, in my flesh) dwells no good thing, for the will to do what is right is present with me, but how to perform what is good I do not find. For the good I desire to do, I do not do, but the evil I do not want is what I do. Now if I do what I do not want, it is no longer I who does it, but sin that lives in me" (Rom. 7:18-20).

Trey says he's "progressed so much in (his) faith over these last several years," and yet he's booked a gig at his first gay-pride festival. Does he not realize "God resists the proud, but gives grace to the humble" (James 4:6, emphasis added)?

Our hearts truly break for this young guy. He's got some great music and a fantastic stage presence. God has clearly gifted him. But he's publicly surrendering to a sinful struggle that will lead him and many others astray.

It's important to see clearly in the midst of the confusion, especially when a Christian leader deliberately chooses the path of sin.

The opposite of homosexuality is not heterosexuality. It's holiness.

And for any Christian who professes Christ, this is our call. Faithful believers must deny themselves and pick up their cross. This is our prayer for ourselves as well as for Trey.

For those who struggle with sinful attractions—regardless of what particular kind of sin—hope is found only in Christ, who has the power to change us from the inside out:

"Therefore, if any man is in Christ, he is a new creature. Old things have passed away. Look, all things have become new" (2 Cor. 5:17).

Get Spirit-filled content delivered right to your inbox! Click here to subscribe to our newsletter.

Great Resources to help you excel in 2019! #1 John Eckhardt's "Prayers That..." 6-Book Bundle. Prayer helps you overcome anything life throws at you. Get a FREE Bonus with this bundle. #2 Learn to walk in the fullness of your purpose and destiny by living each day with Holy Spirit. Buy a set of Life in the Spirit, get a second set FREE.

Your Turn

Comment Guidelines
View/Add Comments
Charisma News - Informing believers with news from a Spirit-filled perspective