State Abortion Amendments Challenge Roe v. Wade Reversal in Key States

(stock.adobe.com)
Read Time: 2 Minutes 57 Seconds

Abortion is on the ballot in November. That's been the cry from both parties for different reasons heading into the midterms.

The issue is expected drive people to the ballot box, with voters in some states having a direct hand in deciding how much, or how little, access to abortion they would have where they live.

In addition to candidates, five states—California, Montana, Michigan, Vermont and Kentucky—will have different abortion proposals on their midterm ballots.

Voters in California, Michigan and Vermont will decide on whether to have the right to an abortion added to their state constitutions.

Kelly Lester, with And Then There Were None Ministries, says her biggest concern is how regulated or unregulated the procedure might become in some of the states.

"By removing any restrictions, which is what they want to do in Michigan and California, it basically makes it a free for all, and so there will be no inspection of abortion facilities, there will be no mandate on the level of care women will be receiving. It makes it a very dangerous thing," Lester said.

If approved, the Kentucky amendment would stop the state from "securing or protecting the right to abortion, or require funding of an abortion."

And in Montana, the "Born Alive" referendum would provide legal rights to infants, including those born alive after an abortion. It could put doctors on the hook for felony charges.

For the rest of this article, visit our content partners at cbnnews.com.

Bring Charisma magazine home with a subscription today!

Reprinted with permission from CBN.com. Copyright © 2022 The Christian Broadcasting Network Inc. All rights reserved."


To contact us or to submit an article, click here.


Get Charisma's best content delivered right to your inbox! Never miss a big news story again. Click here to subscribe to the Charisma News newsletter.

Charisma News - Informing believers with news from a Spirit-filled perspective