No 'Doubt:' New CBS Drama Pushes Dangerous Transgender Agenda

Cast members (L-R) Laverne Cox, Katherine Heigl, Dule Hill and Steven Pasquale smile at a panel for the television series "Doubt"
Cast members (L-R) Laverne Cox, Katherine Heigl, Dule Hill and Steven Pasquale smile at a panel for the television series "Doubt." (REUTERS/Mario Anzuoni)

The new CBS legal drama Doubt premiered on Wednesday night, and while it stars Katherine Heigl, Laverne Cox is getting all the attention for being the first transgender to be cast as a series regular on a network TV show—i.e. liberals are forcing the radical LGBQT agenda on American TV viewers again

Cox plays Cameron, a lawyer whose client, Lester, is a paranoid schizophrenic on trial for murder. In order to get her client a verdict of not-guilty by reason of insanity, Cameron wants Lester to stop taking his medication so his symptoms are more visible to the jury. In this scene, Lester asks if Cameron is a man because "I didn't know if it was real or in my mind." 

Cameron: Just like yesterday, not taking your meds is your choice. 
Lester: You're a man, right? 
Dad: Lester ...
Cameron: It's okay. I'm a woman, but I used to be a man. 
Lester: That's right. I remember you told me. 
Cameron: Are you still comfortable with me representing you? 
Lester: Yeah. I-I just didn't know if it was real or in my mind. 
Cameron: It's real. 
Lester: I'm not taking these. 

Cameron says, "I'm a woman, but I used to be a man."

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Sorry, but there is no "used to be." As much as you change your outside appearance, you can't change your chromosomes. As Dr. Joseph Berger, a Distinguished Life Fellow of the American Psychiatric Association and a Fellow of the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada, says, "Cosmetic surgery will not make a man become a woman, capable of menstruating, ovulating and having children. Cosmetic surgery will not make a woman into a man, capable of generating sperm that can unite with an egg or ovum from a woman and fertilize that egg to produce a human child."

Similarly, Dr. Paul R. McHugh, the former psychiatrist-in-chief for Johns Hopkins Hospital and its current Distinguished Service Professor of Psychiatry has said, "'Sex change' is biologically impossible. People who undergo sex-reassignment surgery do not change from men to women or vice versa. Rather, they become feminized men or masculinized women."

It's very interesting that the show has Cox's character—of all people—talking about mental illness because, after all, gender identity disorder, or gender dysphoria, is a mental illness listed in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders. Dr. McHugh says, "This intensely felt sense of being transgendered constitutes a mental disorder in two respects. The first is that the idea of sex misalignment is simply mistaken—it does not correspond with physical reality. The second is that it can lead to grim psychological outcomes."

This really struck me in one scene where Cameron tells the jury how sick and tormented Lester is because she could very well be describing herself.

Dr. McHugh says, "Policy-makers and the media are doing no favors either to the public or the transgendered by treating their confusions as a right in need of defending rather than as a mental disorder that deserves understanding, treatment and prevention. ... Claiming that this is civil-rights matter and encouraging surgical intervention is in reality to collaborate with and promote a mental disorder."

I'm sure it won't surprise you to hear that Laverne Cox's character and casting were entirely political. According to the Star TribuneDoubt creators Tony Phelan and Joan Rater, who are married and have a transgender son, wanted to have a transgender character so they could "normalize" them to the American people, just as they did with a lesbian couple on Grey's Anatomy: "By putting those characters in people's living rooms week after week, they got to know them and like them. That went a long way in, for lack of a better word, normalizing them, letting people see that their relationship was not this threatening, terrible thing." 

To further force this down our throats, they are also planning some transgender sex scenes between Cox and a man. Cox said, "In the script it says, before our first steamy moment, that it's 'the hottest hotness that has ever existed.'" The creators further explained:

"Laverne's story through the season is the great love story of the show. She falls in love with a cis guy who is a prosecutor," said Phelan.

"Laverne is so charming and the guy, Ben Lawson, who we cast as the love interest—they have amazing chemistry. It was fun to watch their love story emerge. We get to play a lot of themes and conversations that I have not seen on TV," Rater added.

"A little more of the nitty gritty with a trans woman and a cis guy coming together—as well as the fun, and the excitement and sexiness."

Sorry, but I am in no way interested in the "nitty gritty" of what goes on between a man and a transgender woman!

All this is coupled with the revelation that Heigl's character's mother is a "left-wing radical" in jail for killing a police officer in the 1980s—but "she's amazing!" There is no doubt that this show will be a liberal social justice warrior's dream—and a nightmare for the rest of us.

This article originally appeared on NewsBusters.org.

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