What Do Arabs and Abortion Have to Do With the World Cup?

World Cup
What do Arab players, Nazis, and abortion have to do with the World Cup? (Reuters/Pilar Olivares)

Last week's World Cup soccer match between Germany and the U.S. was a loss for Old Glory, which nonetheless advances in World Cup competition.

Of note to pro-lifers are the names and backgrounds of some of the German players, names that would have made the late and unlamented Fuhrer rather unhappy:

  • Shkodran Mustafi, a Muslim man of Albanian descent who was born and raised in Germany.
  • Jérôme Agyenim Boateng, born in then-West Berlin to a Ghanian father and German mother.
  • Mesut Özil, a third-generation German Turk and practicing Muslim known to recite the Quran before games.
  • Sami Khedira, son of a Tunisian man and German woman. Also a Muslim.

Why should people who care about the sanctity of life be interested in these men? Because within living memory, Germany's Nazi government operated on the basis of severe racial and ethnic bigotry. "(Hitler) loathed Arabs (and) once described them as 'lacquered half-apes who ought to be whipped.'"

It is therefore quite gratifying to see that the German national soccer team hosts four men Hitler would have considered sub-human. Why? Because as taught in Scripture and affirmed in America's charter text, the Declaration of Independence, all men are created equal: Arab or Jew, German or Ghanian, every person has been endowed by his Creator with the rights of life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. The image and likeness of God exist in all people, whatever their complexion, hair texture, stature, or any external characteristic, racial heritage, or national background. That Germany now seems to have adopted this principle should be welcome news to all of us who care about that most sacred of human rights, the right to life.

Yet like America, abortion is all too available in Deutschland. As one commentator notes, "German abortion laws are not especially restrictive. Abortion is legal during the first trimester of pregnancy and available if medically or psychologically necessary in the later trimesters."

Two nations with a rich, profound Judeo-Christian heritage affirm the dignity of everyone – except, ironically and tragically, when it comes to the unborn. As Senator Marco Rubio noted in May, "Science is settled, it's not even a consensus, it is a unanimity, that human life begins at conception." Don't the smallest and most vulnerable among us, the unborn, deserve the same protection in law the rest of us enjoy?

Let's keep working and praying for the day when not only Germany and America but all nations will acknowledge the simple but profound truth articulated by Senator Rubio. When they do, and when they enact laws that ban legalized bigotry not only on the basis of race or ethnicity but on the basis of size or place of residence (in the womb or outside of it), World Cup celebrations will suddenly seem very small.


Rob Schwarzwalder is senior vice president at Family Research Council. This article appeared in Religion Today on March 19.

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